My first 3D model!

Started by PlayerSome, 2014 Jun 13, 13:45:14

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PlayerSome

I have been watching a tutorial and this is what I got so far!


michalthekid

Nice so far!

Keep up the good work!  :D

snowflurry

2014 Jun 14, 08:43:26 #2 Last Edit: 2014 Jun 14, 08:45:29 by snowflurry
Just wondering, could you post a version where we could see the polys? Looking at how much detail is in the hands and arms compared to the rest of the body, I would imagine that the poly count for the arms is quite high. That tends to happen when first starting out when you get to the hands, especially when it comes to adding fingers. Its a good start. I'm just asking because when it comes to smoothing later on, having a lot of rows of polys in the chest from the arms can make it still appear quite blocky after smoothing. Sorry if it seems like I'm picking holes I'm just curios and saying what many others have come across when first learning modelling including me (the same thing can happen to the chest from the legs, or the neck if you do lots of detail in the pectoral/chest area from the "valley" (for lack of a better word) in the middle). All and all quite a good start. personally I start with a low/medium base model then add detail once the base shape is done, helps keep the poly flow between parts it can be quite annoying when it comes to attaching, say a leg with a 20 poly edge to the built section in the pelvis which has 14 poly edge, can get quite messy. side note are you bevelling/extruding (making the shape in the torso, adding more polys (usually an extra ring/loop) then pulling then out into the limb shape/start of the limb shape( probably not the best explanation but oh well)) the limbs out, or making them separately and attaching then to the torso. (I'm curious)

Princess Sunset Shimmer


PlayerSome

2014 Jun 15, 14:05:40 #4 Last Edit: 2014 Jun 15, 14:24:42 by PlayerSome
Quote from: snowflurry on 2014 Jun 14, 08:43:26
Just wondering, could you post a version where we could see the polys? Looking at how much detail is in the hands and arms compared to the rest of the body, I would imagine that the poly count for the arms is quite high. That tends to happen when first starting out when you get to the hands, especially when it comes to adding fingers. Its a good start. I'm just asking because when it comes to smoothing later on, having a lot of rows of polys in the chest from the arms can make it still appear quite blocky after smoothing. Sorry if it seems like I'm picking holes I'm just curios and saying what many others have come across when first learning modelling including me (the same thing can happen to the chest from the legs, or the neck if you do lots of detail in the pectoral/chest area from the "valley" (for lack of a better word) in the middle). All and all quite a good start. personally I start with a low/medium base model then add detail once the base shape is done, helps keep the poly flow between parts it can be quite annoying when it comes to attaching, say a leg with a 20 poly edge to the built section in the pelvis which has 14 poly edge, can get quite messy. side note are you bevelling/extruding (making the shape in the torso, adding more polys (usually an extra ring/loop) then pulling then out into the limb shape/start of the limb shape( probably not the best explanation but oh well)) the limbs out, or making them separately and attaching then to the torso. (I'm curious)

I am indeed extruding from the base, i am using a tutorial here (this is the part i am at right now) http://youtu.be/jg-GUvYRHcU?t=50m55s
and thanks for the advise! :D

snowflurry

2014 Jun 15, 21:13:27 #5 Last Edit: 2014 Jun 15, 21:43:54 by snowflurry
nice, its quite good, the poly count is quite low which will make smoothing look quite "smooth" and leaves you free to add more detail later where you need it. the only few things I would suggest is the lines are quite close at the top of the shoulder where the arm meets the torso this may look a little pinched when smoothed, and may be a bit odd when weighted for animating considering where it sits ( that is if you plan to rig, weight and animate it). As well with the upper knuckles, the square shape can be an ok representation for the knuckle bump, but I myself prefer 3 close loops, so you can make the base knuckle shape and also make the indents/grooves for the under side of the finger for bending. but the squares could work fine its all about whether you plan to animate or not (if not I would just extrude the square and the surrounding circle and raise it a tiny bit and scale it down a little)

also when you get to the legs, it is common practice to the legs on a bit of an angle out to the sides( say a 30-40 degree wedge in between the legs) and have the knees a bit bent (this is for animating because you want to have the limbs about halfway between the positions they can bend to, that's why the arms are sticking out to the sides instead of resting against the body or raised strait I the air, those two are the extreme most position they can bend to, and the position you have modelled them in are half way in between. this is to stop major deforming when animating, and makes weight mapping a hell of a lot easier) the same is also usually done with the elbows/forearms they are usually bent a bit forward (say 30 degrees)

if you plan to do the whole thing (not just modelling, but modelling , rigging, texture mapping, weight mapping, controls, textures, and animating (maybe even phonemes if you plan to do great detail to the face) then I wish you the best of luck (I personally cant stand texture mapping, it is not my strong suit).

look forward to seeing more

side note while I don't have much of my work off hand I can show you a group project I worked on if you want to see



I worked on modelling base objects and background objects with many others, a couple of texture maps for the base objects, a few simple base textures, some weapon rigging, many close up character animation (facial expressions and stuff connected to those shots, the animators where given specific shots to animate, and most of mine were close up shots), ambient and folly sound (foot steps, impacts, weapon noises, etc.), character controls (but not rigging), many weapon controls. (and making the check list to make sure every thing has been modelled/weight mapped, texture mapped, and textured) it was about a 18 man group putting in about 5-8 hours a day each for about 2 months. (my strong suits are controls and animating (trying to make the characters express emotions is fun) (and control making made me realise even more how fun the code and maths behind these things are and what made me want to become a coder, still think 3D is great, but when you realise that what you love is the code and charts and graphs and maths behind it, you know you probably should be more of a coder XD (I,m a big math nerd :3 X3) and will be starting my flash game code course in august (I already started this course last year but I ran myself into the ground form 3 years of study with all nighters and late nighters with no breaks between and fell quite ill and had to pull out ( I wasn't really eating all that well during the last year either) but I know that I'm good at it and find it super fun, even if my friends think I'm insane for liking it XP
(sounds also fun ^^)

man, that was meant to be a short lil sentence or two but turned into a rant my bad



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